Tag Archives: women

Everyday Sexism: Girls’ and young women’s views on gender inequality in Australia

Plan International Australia and Our Watch

October 2016

The Plan International Australia and Our Watch survey on young women’s experiences of inequality was conducted by IPSOS Australia with 600 girls and young women aged 15-19 between December 2015 and February 2016. Plan International and Our Watch commissioned this survey to obtain a deeper understanding of young women’s gendered experiences, their most pressing desires for change, and their insights into how to address gender inequality in Australia. This survey explored young women’s experiences, perceptions and suggestions for change in three key areas:

  • Everyday experiences of gender equality, inequality and sexism;
  • Girls’ and young women’s safety – online, at home, school and work, and in relationships;
  • Sexual health and reproductive rights.

Talk About It – NUS Women’s Department 2015 Survey Report

National Union of Students

February 2016

This report details the findings of the National Union of Students (NUS) Women’s Department’s Talk About It survey (2015) and reveals a range of alarming statistics about the experiences of women studying at Australian Universities.  The survey looked at accommodation, safety, student services, sexual assault, harassment and economic difficulties that women enrolled in tertiary education institutions face. It was found that women students have a range of experiences which impact on their ability to participate in and succeed at university including financial difficulties, health problems and family responsibilities. Experiences of harassment, sexual assault and violence at university were also found to be very common, with over 70% of respondents saying that they had experienced some from of harassment during their time at university. In the final pages of the report, the NUS women’s department has provide a number of recommendations to improve support provided for women at university.

She’s Price(d)less: The economics of the gender pay gap

October 2016

KPMG

This report uses structured econometric modelling to determine the factors that underpin the gender pay gap, and to what extent they contribute to the issue. This report,an update to analysis  initially conducted in 2009,shows that despite the endeavours of government and business, the size of the gap, and in particular the role of gender discrimination, has remained stagnant in the past seven years. Given the significant public debate since the release of the original 2009 Report, this update is intended to further contribute to the current public discussion, and drive a deeper and more holistic understanding of the social and economic factors that contribute to the gender pay gap. An Executive Companion, has also been made available. This provides:

  • a snapshot of the research findings
  • a range of practical actions to help address the gender pay gap
  • short case studies outlining the experience and insights of leading Australian companies as they addressed the gap within their own organisations

 

 

Start a Conversation – online resource

2016

Australian Government – a joint Australian, state and territory initiative

This online resource provides  parents, family members, teachers, coaches, community leaders and employers with tools to support conversations with young people about respectful relationships and respect for women. Resources include:

  • a respect checklist  to become more aware of what boys and girls might be thinking in disrespectful or aggressive situations.
  • a conversation guide to help you talk more confidently and openly with young people about the importance of respectful relationships.
  • a series of video messages from parenting educators providing tips to get you started on having conversations about respect.

Shared understandings: Women’s Health West’s guide to health promotion and gender equity

Women’s Health West, 2014

This guide to gender equity and health promotion provides clear and consistent language in key definitions, conceptual frameworks and supporting data relating to gender equity, upstream health promotion and the social determinants of health. Its purpose is to highlight the need for health promotion actions that are sensitive to the social, political and economic conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age.

A high price to pay: The economic case for preventing violence against women

PwC, VicHealth and Our Watch, November 2015

A High Price To Pay -The economic case for preventing VAW, produced by PwC, estimates the costs and benefits of preventing violence against women. It identifies the economic and social costs of violence against women, and which communities of interest are most likely to face the burden of these costs. The report also explores the efficacy of different prevention strategies, including primary prevention.

Horizons – Research Report

Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety (ANROWS), 2015

This ANROWS research report provides substantial additional analysis of data collected in the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ (ABS) 2012 Personal Safety Survey (PSS).

The PSS is the most comprehensive quantitative study of interpersonal violence in Australia. The survey is administered by the ABS and funded by the Australian Government Department of Social Services. More than 17,000 women and men completed the 2012 survey.

The Preventing Violence Against Women Lancet Series

The Lancet, 21 November 2014

In November 2014, The Lancet published a series of papers on violence against women and how to prevent it. The series included papers on a variety of key topics, including: Prevention of violence against women and girls – what does the evidence sayPrevention of violence against women and girls – lessons from practice; and Preventing violence against women – working with men and boys to change social norms and gender relations. Importantly, the series included A Call to Action, imploring the international community to end violence against women and prioritise preventing violence against women before it occurs (primary prevention).

Introducing Our Watch

Our Watch was established by the Commonwealth and Victorian governments in 2013 for the purpose of driving nation-wide change in the culture, behaviours and attitudes that lead to violence against women and children.

Our Watch recently released its five-year strategic plan, which outlines steps to be taken to see more people across Australia community rejecting violence against women and their children, and taking positive action to stop this violence before it happens. They have also released a statement of priorities for 2015.

Also available are a number of policy briefs. Our Watch commissioned these to inform their work. Each brief provides an overview of a key issue relevant to violence against women and their children, including the evidence. More briefs on pertinent issues will be released over time.

Our Watch Policy Brief 1 – Key terms, definitions and statistics

Our Watch Policy Brief 2 – An emerging theory of change

Our Watch Policy Brief 3 – International Evidence Base

Our Watch Policy Brief 4 – Prevention in other policy areas

Australians’ attitudes to violence against women

http://www.vichealth.vic.gov.au/Publications/Freedom-from-violence/2013-National-Community-Attitudes-towards-Violence-Against-Women-Survey.aspx

– VicHealth, 2014

The findings from the 2013 National Community Attitudes Towards Violence Against Women Survey (NCAS) tell us that we have been able to challenge a culture that allows violence against women to occur. There have been sustained improvements since 1995 in a number of areas. However, there are other areas in which progress has been minimal, along with some concerning negative findings.